About the Project

The Aging Well project seeks to improve our current understanding of older immigrants' social needs, networks and support, and how these shape their capacity, resilience, and independence in aging well in Ontario. Our project builds on existing literature and our own work, and will address gaps in knowledge, policy, and practice. To accomplish our goal, we are leveraging the research team's existing collaborations and building new partnerships among academics and community agencies serving older immigrant adults across Ontario.

This project is guided by an intersectionality perspective and ecological model which provides a foundation for exploring the complexity of social identities (e.g., gender, immigration) and their interrelationship with individuals, families, communities, and society as a whole.

 

The Aging Well project is guided by a collaborative, community-based, mixed-methods approach to engage stakeholders (for example, older immigrants, their families, and providers of social, settlement, legal, housing, and transportation services) located at four sites across Ontario (for example, Toronto, Ottawa, Waterloo, and London). The four sites were strategically chosen because of they offer a diverse range of levels of urbanization, community sizes, and immigrants and immigrant-serving organizations. All of these factors shape older immigrants' access to, and use of, social networks and supports.

The project will consist of three phases:

  • Phase 1 will focus on strengthening academic-community partnerships through stakeholder meetings at each site.

  • Phase 2 will explore older immigrants' preferred, and actual, informal and formal networks, model of delivery (for example, the use of technology), and frequency of support used/preferred/accessed, and perceptions of mutual exchange and conflict within such networks.

  • Phase 3 will identify and improve our understanding of the gaps between older immigrants' needs and available services and compare how equitable services are in different communities.​

The Aging Well project is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)